.

.

MARMELADE

.

.

marmelade_stefas_mediterranean

Marmalade is a fruit preserve made from the juice and peel of citrus fruits boiled with sugar and water. It can be produced from kumquats, lemons, limes, grapefruits, mandarins, sweet oranges, bergamots and other citrus fruits, or any combination thereof.

The benchmark citrus fruit for marmalade production in Britain is the Spanish Seville orange, Citrus aurantium var. aurantium, prized for its high pectin content, which gives a good set.

The peel has a distinctive bitter taste which it imparts to the marmalade.

Marmalade is generally distinguished from jam by its fruit peel. It may also be distinguished from jam by the fruits used.

The Romans learned from the Greeks that quinces slowly cooked with honey would “set” when cool (though they did not know about fruit pectin). Greek μελίμηλον (melimēlon, “honey fruit”) transformed into Portuguese “marmelo”—for in Greek μῆλον (mēlon, “apple”) stood for all globular fruits, and most quinces are too astringent to be used without honey. A Roman cookbook attributed to Apicius gives a recipe for preserving whole quinces, stems and leaves attached, in a bath of honey diluted with defrutum—Roman marmalade. Preserves of quince and lemon appear—along with rose, apple, plum and pear—in the Book of ceremonies of the Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos,  “a book that is not only a treatise on the etiquette of imperial banqueting in the ninth century, but a catalogue of the foods available and dishes made from them.”

Medieval quince preserves, which went by the French name cotignac, produced in a clear version and a fruit pulp version, began to lose their medieval seasoning of spices in the 16th century. In the 17th century, La Varenne provided recipes for both thick and clear cotignac.

.

stefas_mediteranean_logo

ASK FOR MARMELADE